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Heart wants to get pregnant in January

  • Written by Mario Bautista
  • Published in Showbiz
  • Read: 882

HEART Evangelista feels sad that her hit primetime show with Dennis Trillo, “Juan Happy Love Story”, is ending on September 2. “Yes, we’re on our last two weeks,” she says. “Maraming nagre-request na i-extend kami kasi we’re rating high. But walang magagawa kasi tapos na talaga 'yung kuwento, buo na.”

Will she and Dennis be reconciled as husband and wife? “Ay, abangan n'yo na lang what will happen kasi napakarami pang mga mangyayaring pleasant twists sa remaining episodes. Hindi madali ang pagdaraanan nina Juan at Happy at maraming hadlang sa kanilang love story. But we really want to thank all those who watched our show. From day one, talagang pataas nang pataas ang ratings namin at patuloy ang pagdating ng positive feedback. Feeling namin, parang early Christmas ang success ng show. This week, abangan nyo, dahil naglasing si Kim Domingo as Agatha at haharangin si Dennis sa driveway at iba-blackmail siya. Makikita ko ito at maririnig ko ang sasabihin ni Dennis na hindi na siya natatakot sa mga pamba-blackmail ni Kim sa kanya at determined siyang bumalik sa akin para itama lahat ng naging pagkakamali niya sa akin. Siempre, abot tainga ang ngiti ko when I heard this.”

Heart will also have a new exhibit for her hand-painted designer bag collection, “Carry Your Heart”, to be held in September at Volkswagen Showroom in Bonifacio Global City. About her plans for motherhood, she reveals that she plans to get preggers in January.
   
“I’m just waiting for the completion of our new 4-bedroom house in New Manila. We have to move in muna kasi di magandang kung kelan ako buntis saka kami lilipat and I'd still have to fix all our stuff. By January, I’ll be ready. I’m 32, my biological clock is ticking, so dapat, by early next year, magka-baby na kami.”

'HERMANO PULI' EARNS RAVES FROM DIFFERENT SECTORS

HERMANO Puli was first filmed in 1979 by FV Alfon starring Tommy Abuel in the title role, with Boots Anson Roa and Alicia Alonzo. Director Gil Portes now comes up with a new version, written by Eric Ramos. The film was previewed for the press and we got to talk to Eric whose script makes a correction about what history books used to say about Apolonio de la Cruz or Hermano Puli.
   
The previous belief is that Puli led a revolt against the Spaniards in the mid-1800s because he was not allowed to be an Indio priest, so he put up the Cofradia de San Jose. But the movie shows that such cofradias or confraternities were really encouraged by the church at that time to help spread the faith and there were many such cofradias in the Tagalog region then, just like the charismatic movements that sprung more recently.
   
Puli, who grew up to be very religious, put up his own cofradia when he was only 18 years old. It was only when he went to Manila later and applied to some orders that he was ruthlessly rejected to be a member of the clergy. The Spanish authorities became alarmed when his cofradia became so big and spread to other provinces, so he was accused of being a heretic and later executed.
   
“Puli was only 27 when he was killed by the Spaniards and our movie wants to show that you can be a hero even at such an early age,” says Direk Gil. “We want to emphasize youthful heroism in our film.”
   
Eric Ramos talked to expert historians as consultants in writing his screenplay. “This is historical drama, so we want to be truthful,” he says. “Kailangan, maging tapat ka sa kasaysayan. I think nagawa naman naming maging tapat sa malinaw na pagpapaliwanag sa naging takbo ng buhay ni Hermano Puli para maipakita 'yung kabayanihang ginawa niya.”
   
The “Hermano Puli” team is now making a round of various campuses to help promote the movie which was previewed to historians, most of whom raved about the movie. History teacher Ann Gabuat of Miriam College says: “The movie succeeds in its attempt to underscore the unbreakable Filipino spirit in the midst of injustice and suffering. The movie’s strength lies in the characterization of Hermano Puli, an inspiring yet unsung hero of Southern Tagalog. The film succeeds in defining heroism and religious freedom and more importantly, in moving its audience to celebrate the bold and steadfast faith of the Filipino.”
   
And this is what Dr. Federico Macaranas of the Asian Institute of Management says: “The film should be seen by our youth. It has a powerful message of faith vs. cult, youthful passion vs. single mindedness, and tragic vs. heroic destiny.”
   
Dr. Merriam Cesar, history professor of University of Makati adds: “I will personally promote this film to my students so they will learn more about our unsung heroes.”
   
Direk Gil says the film on Puli has been in his mind since 1995. “Ang problema, walang gustong mag-produce kasi nga historical kaya expensive gawin. So nalagay ito sa freezer until we met Rex Tiri of T-Rex Productions, owner of Limbaga 77 restaurant who fell in love with the story.”
   
“Noong una, hesitant ako kasi mabigat 'yung project and can be financially draining,” says Rex. “But unang basa ko pa lang ng script, talagang nagustuhan ko na and I want its objective na mas makilala ng mga tao kung sino ba si Hermano Puli, so I gave my full trust to Direk Gil and we’re now very proud of our finished film. We’re hoping the viewers will appreciate and support it too when we open in theaters nationwide on September 21.”

MOVIE REVIEW: BEN HUR

IF you didn't see the Oscar-winning 1959 version of “Ben Hur” directed by William Wyler, you’d probably enjoy the 2016 version directed by Ukrainian filmmaker Timur Bekmambetov (“Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter”). For one thing, the first movie ran for more than 3 hours. The new one is a more abbreviated version of only 2 hours.
   
Based on a novel written by Gen. Lew Wallace in 1880, the new movie starts with the climactic chariot race scene with Judah Ben Hur (Jack Huston) facing his adopted brother Messala (Toby Kebbell). From there, the past is shown in flashbacks, with Ilderim (Morgan Freeman) as the narrator. Eight years ago, Ben Hur, a Jewish nobleman, and Messala are shown riding horses together when Ben Hur meets an accident and Messala saves him.
   
Messala is a Roman and opts to leave to serve the Roman empire. He returns years later as a military officer. When a Jewish rebel that Ben Hur helped tried to kill Messala’s prefect, Pontius Pilate (Pilou Asbaek), Ben Hur, his mom and his sister are all arrested. Ben Hur is made a galley slave rowing warships in the high seas for five years.
   
He regains his freedom when their ship sinks (in the 1959 film, he saves the life of the Roman commander so he was given his freedom). He is then taken as a ward by Ilderim, the chariot owner who is charmed by his being an effective horse whisperer and helps him, through bribery, to get a spot in the chariot race to fight Messala.
   
The new “Ben Hur” is produced by Mark Burnett and Roma Downey, noted for Christian based TV shows as “The Bible” and “Son of God”, so it’s not surprising they chose “Ben Hur”, which is subtitled as “A Tale of the Christ”. Jesus Christ was only briefly shown in the 1959 movie, but he plays a bigger part in the remake.
   
As played by Rodrigo Santoro, he’s first seen as a carpenter who helps defend a man from being stoned to death. He tells Ben Hur: “Love your enemies”. And Ben Hur responds: “Love your enemies? That’s very progressive.” Jesus is later shown being arrested in Gethsemane and being crucified in Golgotha. Just like in the 1959 movie, Jesus heals the mom and sister of Ben Hur who have become lepers, but under different circumstances.
   
What’s nice is that the characters now speak in a very contemporary tone. The new film makes other changes compared to the first one, but you should bear in mind that this film is intended for viewers of this generation. The action scenes are quite well staged, especially the chariot race and the sea battle where Ben Hur’s boat sinks.
   
The violence is quite restrained compared to past works of Bekmambetov, which is understandable since this one delivers a more concrete inspirational Christian message and is family friendly. Ben Hur here experiences conversion after Jesus died on the cross and the emphasis here is in forgiveness.
   
But we feel that the movie’s original song that’s played over the closing credits, “The Only Way Out”, is quite awkward.
   
Jack Huston, a British actor who’s the grandson of Director John Huston, did supporting roles in films like “American Hustle” and “Hail Caesar”. He’s credible in the title role, but he’s no Charlton Heston whose larger than life portrayal of Ben Hur won him an Oscar best actor award. And Toby Kebbell as Messala definitely pales even more in comparison to the charismatic Stephen Boyd. This is actually the third film version of “Ben Hur” as it was first filmed as a silent movie (which we didn’t get to see) and it looks like that the third time is definitely not the charm.